When is it too late for me to quit smoking? (Never! Health benefits begin as soon as 20 minutes after quitting.)

If you're a smoker or know someone who smokes, there's good news!
It's never too late to quit smoking: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), within 20 minutes after you smoke that last cigarette, your body begins a series of changes that continue for years.

Time after quitting   Health benefits
20 minutes   Your heart rate drops.
12 hours   Carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
2 weeks to 3 months   Your heart attach risk begins to drop.
Your lung function begins to improve.
1 to 9 months   Your coughing and shortness of breath decrease.
1 year   Your added risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker's.
5 years   Your stroke risk is reduced to that of a nonsmoker's 5-15 years after quitting.
10 years   Your lung cancer death rate is about half that of a smoker's.
Risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas decreases.
15 years   Your risk of coronary heart disease is back to that of a nonsmoker's.

But that's not all! Other health reasons to stop smoking include... dangers of smoking

  • ulcer risk drops after quitting.
  • bladder cancer risk is halved a few years after quitting.
  • peripheral artery disease risk goes down after quitting.
  • cervical cancer risk is reduced a few years after quitting.
  • risk of developing diabetes decreases and, for someone who already has diabetes, managing the disease becomes easier.
  • risk of developing osteoporosis decreases.
  • low birth weight baby risk drops to normal if women quit before pregnancy or during your first trimester.
  • sex life improves (men because they are less likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction).
  • breath, clothes and hair smell better and teeth become whiter.
  • food tastes better.
  • blood oxygen level increases so muscles become stronger and tire less easily. Also, non-smokers experience less pain and muscle aches.
  • body experiences a wide range of health benefits.
SHOP LOW PRICES on Amazon's Top 100* Best Selling Smoking Cessation Products
+ Free Shipping & Returns on Eligible Items.
(*Amazon's Top 100 list updated hourly.)

With all these health benefits, there's never been a better time to quit! The good news is that over half of all adult smokers have already successfully quit. Plus, if you are one of the nearly 3 out of 4 current smokers who is serious about kicking the habit, many tips and resources available to help you quit smoking.

Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW for help or ask your healthcare provider to help you make a plan for quitting.


From the Research Desk...

Vitamin D deficiency linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers, obesity, autoimmune deseases and even premature death

Kansas City, Kansas - Vitamin D deficiency was associated with cardiovascular disease risk and death, whereas Vitamin D supplementation was associated with better survival, according to researchers in the American Journal of Cardiology.

In the study, scientists from the University of Kansas analyzed data on 10,899 patients and found that 70% of them were deficient in Vitamin D. Those who were D-deficient were 40% more likely to have hypertension, 30% more likely to have cardiomyopathy, and twice as likely to have diabetes than those without a deficiency. Plus, they were three times more likely to die from any cause.

Patients who took Vitamin D supplements had a 60% lower risk of death from any cause, especially those who had previously been deficient.

The cause of the problem, according to a Boston University School of Medicine paper published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition is that:

  • most of us do not receive a moderate amount of sun exposure
  • very few foods are naturally rich in Vitamin D
  • foods that have been fortified with Vitamin D often contain inadequate amounts

Since they feel that Vitamin D deficiency has reached pandemic proportions, they also suggest that both children and adults consider taking Vitamin D supplements.

Oat fiber helps lower cholesterol, says Health Canada

Ottawa, Ontario - In a recent decision, Health Canada concluded that scientific studies support the claim that consumption of oat fiber is linked to a reduction in blood cholesterol. As a result, they announced that beta-glucan oat fiber products -- oat fiber lowers cholesterolthat meet set criteria -- can claim they help lower cholesterol.

The sources of oat fiber eligible for the claim are oat bran, rolled oats (also known as oatmeal) and whole oat flour that are either food themselves (oat bran and rolled oats) or are ingredients in formulated foods (oat bran, rolled oats and whole oat flour).

Low Prices on Best Selling
SMOKING CESSATION
PRODUCTS

SHOP NOW AT AMAZON

Join our discussions:
spacer
A Sampling of Today's Health News Headlines
BBC News - Health
BBC News - Health
BBC News - Health
09/18/2018 08:19 PM
Yoghurts (even organic ones) 'full of sugar'
Public told not to be lulled into thinking yoghurts are as healthy as many assume.
09/19/2018 06:01 AM
Making sure you get the right type of calorie
Meet the latest dietary idea being used in the battle against the bulge - the "quality" calorie.
09/19/2018 07:30 AM
Are drink-driving limits too high?
How are the limits on how much alcohol you can drink set?
09/18/2018 04:59 AM
Pregnancy weight gain 'going unmeasured'
Midwives want clear advice about how much weight is healthy for women to put on during pregnancy.
09/18/2018 10:53 AM
South Africa's highest court legalises cannabis use
Pro-marijuana activists cheer following a landmark ruling by the country's highest court.
09/17/2018 09:33 PM
Hiding my psychosis for 10 years from the age of 12
Luke Watkin first experienced psychosis at 12 years old - he didn't talk about it for a decade.
09/19/2018 01:32 AM
Bacteria disrupts Northern Ireland breast milk service
Donated breast milk held in the County Fermanagh facility is destroyed after a bug is found in the water supply.
09/17/2018 09:39 PM
Bedside light tool could detect baby brain injury earlier
A new bedside tool can detect brain damage by measuring oxygen and energy levels using light.
09/17/2018 09:49 AM
Deaths spiked during UK heatwave
When temperatures went up in England this summer, so did deaths, Office for National Statistics data shows.
09/17/2018 06:32 AM
Targeted treatment for melanoma to be free on NHS
Trials showed the risk of the cancer returning after surgery was reduced with the therapy.
Well
Well

09/18/2018 02:26 PM
For Capitalism, Every Social Leap Forward Is a Marketing Opportunity
Brands are now racing to capture the market of young people who strive to live gender identities that fit.
09/18/2018 02:07 PM
How to Get Strong
You don’t have to lift like a bodybuilder (or look like one) to benefit from resistance training. And the best part is that it’s never too late to get started. Read our latest subscriber guide.
09/18/2018 12:42 PM
High-Dose Folic Acid Does Not Prevent High Blood Pressure of Pregnancy
Some studies suggest that taking high doses of folic acid can prevent pre-eclampsia, but a randomized trial found it did not.
09/18/2018 12:21 PM
Excess Weight Gain or Loss During Pregnancy Tied to Child’s Heart Health
Women who put on excess pounds, or not enough weight, had children at risk for high blood pressure and other problems.
09/18/2018 10:59 AM
I’m a Proud Atheist. Why Shouldn’t I Tell My Religious In-Laws?
A reader would rather not attend church or recite Bible verses at his wife’s family reunion. But he’s not sure what to do about it.
09/17/2018 03:00 PM
The Quest to Create and Perfect an Artificial Heart
Mimi Swartz’s “Ticker” tells the story of the doctors who, against all odds, struggled to make a device to replace one of our most vital organs.
09/16/2018 10:00 AM
Low-Dose Aspirin Late in Life? Healthy People May Not Need It
Millions take aspirin to prevent heart attacks, strokes and cancer. New research shows older people in good health may not need it — and should not start taking it.
09/15/2018 06:00 AM
How I Dressed to Heal My Heartbreak
One of my only productive strategies for working with fear was dressing with intention. That became even more important when I was healing myself.
09/14/2018 11:52 AM
For Elderly Women With Breast Cancer, Surgery May Not Be the Best Option
Nursing home patients may be frail or have other diseases, leading some doctors to advise hormone therapy rather than operations.
All Mayo Clinic health information topics
All Mayo Clinic health information topics
Mayo Clinic offers award-winning medical and health information and tools for healthy living.
09/18/2018 12:00 AM
Prescription weight-loss drugs

09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Orange slices with citrus syrup
This recipe combines several orange flavors, which add an interesting depth to this dessert.
09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Orange dream smoothie
Here's one way to enjoy soy milk: a frothy cooler that tastes like an old-fashioned Creamsicle. One serving has 109 milligrams of calcium.
09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Muesli breakfast bars
The rolled oats, nuts and fruit in these breakfast bars make them a healthy and filling breakfast option. One serving has just 162 calories and 1 gram of saturated fat.
09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Thermometers: Understand the options

09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Yellow lentils with spinach and ginger
This flavorful dish is loaded with fiber.
09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Diabetes treatment: Medications for type 2 diabetes

09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Green smoothie

09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Whole-grain banana bread
This twist on banana bread uses rice, amaranth, millet, quinoa and tapioca flours — making it safe for people with gluten sensitivity.
09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Roasted squash soup

09/15/2018 12:00 AM
Healthy body image: Tips for guiding girls

 
Copyright 2018 MassachusettsHealth.com. All rights reserved. rss Subscribe to our RSS
Information provided here should not be relied on to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any condition, disease or illness. Please consult with your physician or health care professional for guidance on any health concern. MassachusettsHealth.com is a commercial website and is not affiliated with any government agency, university, or private medical center. COMPENSATION DISCLOSURE: This site may be compensated for products promoted here. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.