When is it too late for me to quit smoking? (Never! Health benefits begin as soon as 20 minutes after quitting.)

If you're a smoker or know someone who smokes, there's good news!
It's never too late to quit smoking: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), within 20 minutes after you smoke that last cigarette, your body begins a series of changes that continue for years.

Time after quitting   Health benefits
20 minutes   Your heart rate drops.
12 hours   Carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
2 weeks to 3 months   Your heart attach risk begins to drop.
Your lung function begins to improve.
1 to 9 months   Your coughing and shortness of breath decrease.
1 year   Your added risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker's.
5 years   Your stroke risk is reduced to that of a nonsmoker's 5-15 years after quitting.
10 years   Your lung cancer death rate is about half that of a smoker's.
Risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas decreases.
15 years   Your risk of coronary heart disease is back to that of a nonsmoker's.

But that's not all! Other health reasons to stop smoking include... dangers of smoking

  • ulcer risk drops after quitting.
  • bladder cancer risk is halved a few years after quitting.
  • peripheral artery disease risk goes down after quitting.
  • cervical cancer risk is reduced a few years after quitting.
  • risk of developing diabetes decreases and, for someone who already has diabetes, managing the disease becomes easier.
  • risk of developing osteoporosis decreases.
  • low birth weight baby risk drops to normal if women quit before pregnancy or during your first trimester.
  • sex life improves (men because they are less likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction).
  • breath, clothes and hair smell better and teeth become whiter.
  • food tastes better.
  • blood oxygen level increases so muscles become stronger and tire less easily. Also, non-smokers experience less pain and muscle aches.
  • body experiences a wide range of health benefits.
SHOP LOW PRICES on Amazon's Top 100* Best Selling Smoking Cessation Products
+ Free Shipping & Returns on Eligible Items.
(*Amazon's Top 100 list updated hourly.)

With all these health benefits, there's never been a better time to quit! The good news is that over half of all adult smokers have already successfully quit. Plus, if you are one of the nearly 3 out of 4 current smokers who is serious about kicking the habit, many tips and resources available to help you quit smoking.

Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW for help or ask your healthcare provider to help you make a plan for quitting.


From the Research Desk...

Vitamin D deficiency linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers, obesity, autoimmune deseases and even premature death

Kansas City, Kansas - Vitamin D deficiency was associated with cardiovascular disease risk and death, whereas Vitamin D supplementation was associated with better survival, according to researchers in the American Journal of Cardiology.

In the study, scientists from the University of Kansas analyzed data on 10,899 patients and found that 70% of them were deficient in Vitamin D. Those who were D-deficient were 40% more likely to have hypertension, 30% more likely to have cardiomyopathy, and twice as likely to have diabetes than those without a deficiency. Plus, they were three times more likely to die from any cause.

Patients who took Vitamin D supplements had a 60% lower risk of death from any cause, especially those who had previously been deficient.

The cause of the problem, according to a Boston University School of Medicine paper published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition is that:

  • most of us do not receive a moderate amount of sun exposure
  • very few foods are naturally rich in Vitamin D
  • foods that have been fortified with Vitamin D often contain inadequate amounts

Since they feel that Vitamin D deficiency has reached pandemic proportions, they also suggest that both children and adults consider taking Vitamin D supplements.

Oat fiber helps lower cholesterol, says Health Canada

Ottawa, Ontario - In a recent decision, Health Canada concluded that scientific studies support the claim that consumption of oat fiber is linked to a reduction in blood cholesterol. As a result, they announced that beta-glucan oat fiber products -- oat fiber lowers cholesterolthat meet set criteria -- can claim they help lower cholesterol.

The sources of oat fiber eligible for the claim are oat bran, rolled oats (also known as oatmeal) and whole oat flour that are either food themselves (oat bran and rolled oats) or are ingredients in formulated foods (oat bran, rolled oats and whole oat flour).

Low Prices on Best Selling
SMOKING CESSATION
PRODUCTS

SHOP NOW AT AMAZON

Join our discussions:
spacer
A Sampling of Today's Health News Headlines
BBC News
BBC News
BBC News - Health
04/15/2024 05:08 AM
Young nose cells may help children fight off Covid
Lab tests show ageing adult nose cells contain 100 times more virus soon after an infection.
04/11/2024 07:58 PM
NHS spring Covid booster jab bookings to open
People eligible for the free vaccine in England, including everyone aged over 74, can book from Monday.
04/11/2024 11:57 PM
Paxman: Parkinson's makes you wish you'd not been born
The former University Challenge presenter delivers a list of recommendations to Downing Street.
04/15/2024 03:20 AM
'No end to the stress' of ADHD medication shortage
Those with the condition say their struggle to get the drugs they need is causing increasing anxiety.
04/12/2024 05:53 AM
Nine-year-olds added to malicious WhatsApp groups
Schools warn thousands of parents on Tyneside about malicious group chats on the messaging app.
04/11/2024 03:01 PM
Gang culture at neurosurgery department, doctor alleges
Neurosurgeon Mansoor Foroughi alleges he was dismissed after he raised safety concerns.
04/11/2024 02:24 PM
PM defends NHS record as targets missed in England
The latest figures show many patients face long waits, but the PM insists headway is being made.
04/08/2024 01:19 PM
'The NHS paid for my mum to go private. She died'
BBC Panorama investigates patient safety at a major private provider used by the NHS.
04/04/2024 07:00 PM
New cause of asthma damage revealed
Cells lining the airways are squeezed to destruction, setting up a cycle of harm, lab studies suggest.
04/07/2024 04:13 AM
'Radiographer started crying during my cancer scan'
Molly Cuddihy shares her story in a podcast covering themes including mental health and body image.
NYT > Well
NYT > Well

04/15/2024 05:02 AM
What is Melanoma? Symptoms and Risk Factors of Skin Cancer
We asked experts what to know about melanoma symptoms, treatment and prevention.
04/15/2024 05:03 AM
Here’s What to Ask Your Dentist When Evaluating Your Treatment
To get the best care, experts recommend speaking up. Here are tips for what to ask and how to evaluate the treatments you are offered.
04/12/2024 02:31 PM
Complications From Alcohol Use Are Rising Among Women
New research shows that alcohol-related liver disease and other health problems increased even more than expected among women ages 40 to 64 during the pandemic.
04/12/2024 05:05 AM
Get Organized Quickly With These Decluttering ‘Sprints’
You can finish them in 30 minutes or less.
04/12/2024 05:03 AM
Tell Us About the Mother Figures in Your Life
With Mother’s Day around the corner, we’re looking for stories about the various ways you have mothered or been mothered.
04/11/2024 11:45 AM
CDC Investigates Illnesses Linked to Possible Fake Botox Injections
People in several states have fallen ill after receiving injections outside of doctors’ offices.
04/11/2024 11:02 AM
What Is VO2 Max?
VO2 max has become ubiquitous in fitness circles. But what does it measure and how important is it to know yours?
04/12/2024 12:32 PM
How to Be Less Self-Critical When Perfectionism Is a Trap
Perfectionism among young people has skyrocketed, but experts say there are ways to quiet your inner critic.
04/10/2024 05:00 AM
5 Tips for Exercising During Allergy Season
Rising pollen counts make outdoor workouts uncomfortable and can affect performance. Here are five strategies for breathing easier.
All Mayo Clinic health information topics
All Mayo Clinic health information topics
Mayo Clinic offers award-winning medical and health information and tools for healthy living.
04/13/2024 12:00 AM
COVID-19: Who's at higher risk of serious symptoms?

04/11/2024 12:00 AM
Alzheimer's: Medicines help manage symptoms and slow decline

04/10/2024 12:00 AM
Insect bites and stings: First aid

04/10/2024 12:00 AM
Young-onset Alzheimer's: When symptoms begin before age 65

04/09/2024 12:00 AM
Getting past a weight-loss plateau

04/09/2024 12:00 AM
Alli weight-loss pill: Does it work?

04/09/2024 12:00 AM
Delusional parasitosis

04/09/2024 12:00 AM
Antibiotics: Are you misusing them?

04/05/2024 12:00 AM
Pregnancy and COVID-19: What are the risks?

04/05/2024 12:00 AM
Treating COVID-19 at home: Care tips for you and others

04/05/2024 12:00 AM
Chemotherapy nausea and vomiting: Prevention is best defense

 
Copyright 2024 MassachusettsHealth.com. All rights reserved. rss Subscribe to our RSS
Information provided here should not be relied on to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any condition, disease or illness. Please consult with your physician or health care professional for guidance on any health concern. MassachusettsHealth.com is a commercial website and is not affiliated with any government agency, university, or private medical center. COMPENSATION DISCLOSURE: This site may be compensated for products promoted here. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.