When is it too late for me to quit smoking? (Never! Health benefits begin as soon as 20 minutes after quitting.)

If you're a smoker or know someone who smokes, there's good news!
It's never too late to quit smoking: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), within 20 minutes after you smoke that last cigarette, your body begins a series of changes that continue for years.

Time after quitting   Health benefits
20 minutes   Your heart rate drops.
12 hours   Carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
2 weeks to 3 months   Your heart attach risk begins to drop.
Your lung function begins to improve.
1 to 9 months   Your coughing and shortness of breath decrease.
1 year   Your added risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker's.
5 years   Your stroke risk is reduced to that of a nonsmoker's 5-15 years after quitting.
10 years   Your lung cancer death rate is about half that of a smoker's.
Risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas decreases.
15 years   Your risk of coronary heart disease is back to that of a nonsmoker's.

But that's not all! Other health reasons to stop smoking include... dangers of smoking

  • ulcer risk drops after quitting.
  • bladder cancer risk is halved a few years after quitting.
  • peripheral artery disease risk goes down after quitting.
  • cervical cancer risk is reduced a few years after quitting.
  • risk of developing diabetes decreases and, for someone who already has diabetes, managing the disease becomes easier.
  • risk of developing osteoporosis decreases.
  • low birth weight baby risk drops to normal if women quit before pregnancy or during your first trimester.
  • sex life improves (men because they are less likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction).
  • breath, clothes and hair smell better and teeth become whiter.
  • food tastes better.
  • blood oxygen level increases so muscles become stronger and tire less easily. Also, non-smokers experience less pain and muscle aches.
  • body experiences a wide range of health benefits.
SHOP LOW PRICES on Amazon's Top 100* Best Selling Smoking Cessation Products
+ Free Shipping & Returns on Eligible Items.
(*Amazon's Top 100 list updated hourly.)

With all these health benefits, there's never been a better time to quit! The good news is that over half of all adult smokers have already successfully quit. Plus, if you are one of the nearly 3 out of 4 current smokers who is serious about kicking the habit, many tips and resources available to help you quit smoking.

Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW for help or ask your healthcare provider to help you make a plan for quitting.


From the Research Desk...

Vitamin D deficiency linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers, obesity, autoimmune deseases and even premature death

Kansas City, Kansas - Vitamin D deficiency was associated with cardiovascular disease risk and death, whereas Vitamin D supplementation was associated with better survival, according to researchers in the American Journal of Cardiology.

In the study, scientists from the University of Kansas analyzed data on 10,899 patients and found that 70% of them were deficient in Vitamin D. Those who were D-deficient were 40% more likely to have hypertension, 30% more likely to have cardiomyopathy, and twice as likely to have diabetes than those without a deficiency. Plus, they were three times more likely to die from any cause.

Patients who took Vitamin D supplements had a 60% lower risk of death from any cause, especially those who had previously been deficient.

The cause of the problem, according to a Boston University School of Medicine paper published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition is that:

  • most of us do not receive a moderate amount of sun exposure
  • very few foods are naturally rich in Vitamin D
  • foods that have been fortified with Vitamin D often contain inadequate amounts

Since they feel that Vitamin D deficiency has reached pandemic proportions, they also suggest that both children and adults consider taking Vitamin D supplements.

Oat fiber helps lower cholesterol, says Health Canada

Ottawa, Ontario - In a recent decision, Health Canada concluded that scientific studies support the claim that consumption of oat fiber is linked to a reduction in blood cholesterol. As a result, they announced that beta-glucan oat fiber products -- oat fiber lowers cholesterolthat meet set criteria -- can claim they help lower cholesterol.

The sources of oat fiber eligible for the claim are oat bran, rolled oats (also known as oatmeal) and whole oat flour that are either food themselves (oat bran and rolled oats) or are ingredients in formulated foods (oat bran, rolled oats and whole oat flour).

Low Prices on Best Selling
SMOKING CESSATION
PRODUCTS

SHOP NOW AT AMAZON

Join our discussions:
spacer
A Sampling of Today's Health News Headlines
BBC News - Health
BBC News - Health
BBC News - Health
03/22/2019 08:21 PM
Detailed images of baby heart inside the womb
New technology could improve the care of babies with congenital heart diseases.
03/21/2019 08:52 PM
'Baby Grady' gives fertility hope to boys with cancer
A new approach could preserve fertility for boys having cancer treatment - thanks to a baby monkey.
03/22/2019 08:49 AM
Advertising watchdog rules fake autism 'cure' adverts must stop
The advertising watchdog is targeting practitioners of Cease therapy, which has no scientific basis.
03/21/2019 11:12 AM
Assisted dying: Doctors' group adopts neutral position
The Royal College of Physicians votes to adopt a neutral position on helping terminally ill patients die.
03/21/2019 09:39 AM
Hancock criticised over DNA test 'over reaction'
England's health secretary said it had saved his life by revealing a "higher risk of prostate cancer".
03/21/2019 12:53 PM
IVF ethics pioneer Mary Warnock dies
The philosopher Baroness Mary Warnock has died at the age of 94.
03/21/2019 12:59 PM
Cervical screening: DIY smear test could be 'game-changer'
Women who miss cervical screening appointments will be given home-testing kits in a pilot scheme.
03/20/2019 10:50 PM
NHS 'no chance of training enough staff'
Experts are warning nurses and GP shortages will worsen in England, unless radical action is taken.
03/20/2019 11:20 PM
Testosterone rules for female athletes 'unscientific'
There is a lack of evidence for the cut-off point adopted by athletics chiefs, a BMJ editorial says.
03/20/2019 01:00 PM
Instagram eating disorder content 'out of control'
Psychiatrists raise concerns as the BBC finds children are swapping extreme images of weight loss.
Well
Well

03/23/2019 08:00 AM
What to Do When You Are a Runner Who Can’t Run on Race Day
Should go you anyway? It depends.
03/22/2019 12:42 PM
An Alzheimer’s Drug Trial Gave Me Hope, and Then It Ended
I was a small piece in the search to find a cure. Now I feel as if I’m getting erased, and medical science doesn’t have any answers.
03/22/2019 11:05 AM
For Urinary Incontinence, Try Behavioral Treatments or Drugs, or Both
Bladder training, biofeedback and other behavioral therapies may work even better in combination with drugs.
03/22/2019 07:46 AM
Seeing Myself Through My Child’s Eyes
As a working mom of four, I often feel as if it is impossible to ever be enough. But our children may judge us more generously than we judge ourselves.
03/22/2019 05:00 AM
My Temporary Hoarding Habit
When my daughter was hospitalized for cancer treatment, I began collecting leftover condiments and medical supplies in an effort to control something in our uncontrollable world.
03/22/2019 12:00 AM
When Chivalry Is More Control Than Care
After a breakup, a woman wonders if traditional romance is a trap, and finds that the ordinary is the most romantic gesture of all.
03/21/2019 02:49 PM
Our Teen Houseguest Seems to Be Stealing Stuff
Should we confront her?
03/21/2019 05:00 AM
Sugary Drinks Tied to Shorter Life Span
“The optimal intake of these drinks is zero,” said one expert. “They have no health benefits.”
03/20/2019 02:58 PM
A User Guide for Your Knees
A knee is designed to withstand millions of steps during a lifetime, but sometimes all that stress can have ill effects. Here’s how to care for and use your knees for many years to come.
All Mayo Clinic health information topics
All Mayo Clinic health information topics
Mayo Clinic offers award-winning medical and health information and tools for healthy living.
03/22/2019 12:00 AM
Guacamole with beans

03/22/2019 12:00 AM
Weight-loss readiness
Before you plunge into a weight-loss program, see if you're truly ready to change.
03/22/2019 12:00 AM
Rev up your workout with interval training

03/22/2019 12:00 AM
Sweet potato waffles with blueberry syrup
A hint of spices and a blanket of juicy berries make these waffles a breakfast treat.
03/22/2019 12:00 AM
Baby beet and orange salad

03/22/2019 12:00 AM
Childhood vaccines: Tough questions, straight answers

03/22/2019 12:00 AM
Eating and exercise: 5 tips to maximize your workouts

03/21/2019 12:00 AM
Runny nose

03/20/2019 12:00 AM
Asian vegetable salad

03/20/2019 12:00 AM
Diabetes and Alzheimer's linked

03/20/2019 12:00 AM
Grilled cod with crispy citrus salad

 
Copyright 2019 MassachusettsHealth.com. All rights reserved. rss Subscribe to our RSS
Information provided here should not be relied on to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any condition, disease or illness. Please consult with your physician or health care professional for guidance on any health concern. MassachusettsHealth.com is a commercial website and is not affiliated with any government agency, university, or private medical center. COMPENSATION DISCLOSURE: This site may be compensated for products promoted here. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.